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Interstate Family Law Disputes

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We live in a mobile society. People move with their children to different states and countries. To address conflicts between these different jurisdictions, Texas and other states have adopted very similar, if not identical, uniform laws. Chief among them are the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA), which addresses child custody, visitation, and termination disputes, and the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act (UIFSA), which addresses child support. These statutes are complex, frequently misunderstood by attorneys and courts. Failure to comply with these statutes can result in a void order. A void order is an order that has no legal effect and can be challenged at any time, even long after the order was signed.

If any of the parties in the suit or a child live in different states or countries, or if there is a previous order affecting the child from another state or country, do not assume where the new suit must be filed or tried. Instead, consult with our family law attorneys to determine how these laws apply to the facts of your case and learn where the new suit may or must be heard.

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Interstate Family Law Disputes

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    Interstate Family Law Disputes

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    We live in a mobile society. People move with their children to different states and countries. To address conflicts between these different jurisdictions, Texas and other states have adopted very similar, if not identical, uniform laws. Chief among them are the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA), which addresses child custody, visitation, and termination disputes, and the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act (UIFSA), which addresses child support. These statutes are complex, frequently misunderstood by attorneys and courts. Failure to comply with these statutes can result in a void order. A void order is an order that has no legal effect and can be challenged at any time, even long after the order was signed.

    If any of the parties in the suit or a child live in different states or countries, or if there is a previous order affecting the child from another state or country, do not assume where the new suit must be filed or tried. Instead, consult with our family law attorneys to determine how these laws apply to the facts of your case and learn where the new suit may or must be heard.

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